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20130109
20130109
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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
are important for the role of pakistan and many others. with that, let me turn to our three speakers, each of whom will speak for summer between six and ten minute roughly speaking and then we will open up to questions or dialogue with respect to the audience. we will start with jim, if you are ready, give you the floor. >> my response ability for afghanistan goes back to 2001 and is fair to say the time was present for creation of the current regime and i start by looking back and try to spot the things we did wrong at the time and it strikes me there were three fundamental errors two of which i perceive that the time and tried to do something about and one of which i failed to proceed entirely and did nothing about. one was the decision not to deploy any american or international peacekeepers in the country. we have a country with no police force and no army and we decided security would be an afghan responsibility after the fall of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we successfully built for the war and the peace conference disintegrate.
soldiers, which the military blamed on pakistan. he added that this should not derail stronger cross border ties. >> this is completely unacceptable. but at the same time, it's very important we make sure that whatever has happened may not -- should not be escalated. >> the indian military says a deadly gunfight with pakistani forces took place on tuesday. two indian soldiers were killed, one injured. it says the remains of the dead soldiers were mutilated. pakistan denies the negotiation. they have resumed comprehensive talks, which include the delicate subject of kashmir to try to improve bilateral relationship. another gunfight killed one pakistani soldier and injured another. observers say such incidents threaten to harm relations between the two nuclear neighbors. >>> politics in pakistan is heading for a potentially game-changing moment. former sporting hero turned politics enran kahn is wins legions of fans with his fierce stance against u.s. military policy and with parliamentary elections due by may, there is everything to play for. nhk world reports. >> reporter: imuran khan is ri
to the important issues regarding pakistan, with respect to the important issues regarding the region. we called the event "back to the future." some people have spoken before about this, and what we mean by that. i think we will let that emerged as the discussion goes on. we know we have a lot of fundamental issues to talk about. certainly, military presence has been an issue talked about in the newspapers all lot. governance is an important issue. technical issues, such as what type of agreements might be signed between the u.s. and afghanistan, are important. the role of pakistan. many others. with that, let me turn to our three speakers, each of whom will speak for six to 10 minutes, roughly speaking. then we'll open it up to dialogue, with the audience. i will give you the floor. >> my responsibilities for afghanistan go back to 2001. it is fair to say i was present at the creation of at least the current regime in kabul. i started by looking back and trying to spot the things we did wrong. it strikes me that there were three fundamental errors, two of which are perceived at the time and tr
powerhouse. india summons pakistan's top diplomat over the killing of two of its soldiers. the soap opera that was pulled off the air in thailand. was it too violent or just to political? >> morning and 2000 prisoners are to be released by the syrian government in exchange for 48 iranian hostages. the iranian men were kidnapped in august by rebel forces, and they delivered an ultimatum october saying they would kill the hostages if syrian prisoners were not released. the swap was brokered by a turkish charity. for more let's bring in hashem, joining us near the border with syria. what do we know on the swap deal? >> the main charity, the humanitarian based assistance that broker the deal, they said the prisoner swap is under way. 48 iranians were released on the outskirts of the capital and 2100 syrians are to be released in different areas. damascus, homs, hana -- so it is going to take a few hours during the day before the whole process is completed. what is happening is the following. measures from a aid agency along with it -- officials from the ministry of the interior are monitoring
pakistan and india were at a nadir. coins and with 9/11 and the subsequent bond process, a pakistani base -- terrorist group had conducted a large- scale terrorist attack on the indian parliament. the countries were close to war. very close to war. the idea that they would collaborate in some joint venture in afghanistan was more difficult to conceive then that might be now. relations have to some degree improved. i do not think that india and pakistan between them would be able to substitute for the kind of assistance -- [indiscernible] for some time to come. to the extent the country's -- countries could agree on some form of joint collaboration, i would not oppose it. but neither would i look to it to shoulder much of the load in the short to medium term. >> from rote. -- front row. >> i write the mitchell reports and also councilmember. fassel -- i wanted to ask the ambassador about his observations about cost and risk. and to do that in the context of american domestic political setting, just to say that 2014 is not just another year. it is midterms. i wonder if there is a way, if yo
vantage to cross what is called the line of control that separates india and pakistan in parts of kashmir. >> while the patrol was out, they came across pakistani troops, which come into indian territory, and they probably made use of bad weather conditions. while the pakistani troops were challenged and firefight ensued between the parties. >> two indian soldiers died, and one was mutilated. pakistan has released this statement. pakistan military officials denied accusations of unprovoked fighting. the latest incident is being seen as one of the most serious breaches of the ceasefire between the countries. >> the potential for escalation is considerable, and i hope the facts of the case are established at the very earliest, because in the of zandt the pakistani military had been taking the support of this, in many ways, this would be setting the population's back in a very irreparable manner. >> india and pakistan have tried to mend their differences by playing each other in friendly cricket matches. they encourage people to interact, but despite the effort, there has been an increase in
pakistan interfering with the country and also the taliban not coming back. that is a real concern when july 2011 was the drawdown date. >> what can 8000 troops do to stop that happening? >> a good question. i would find it hard to believe that the u.s. government would not leave some number of troops. think about the blood and treasure that has gone into this. it is not just the united states. it is the u.s. and nato policy for continuation of a presence past 2014. is it a combat presence? no. it is a support to counter terrorism and a training program. the distinction between that and the combat provinces in the eye of the beholder. >> you have been following afghanistan for over a decade. your new book is "talibanistan." is that how you see the future of the country? >> luckily not. if you look at polling data, most afghans did not want the taliban. they want some negotiated settlement. it will have another election with a high turnout and they're all the things that have gone right. we know what has gone wrong. whether it is very few minds or it is girls in schools. i was there when
agreed to pull out of the eastern city of goma last month. >> india has accused pakistan of killing two of its soldiers near their disputed border in kashmir. india has described it as a provocative action and said the two soldiers were killed in a firefight with pakistani forces who entered indian territory. on monday, pakistan claimed indian forces had raided one of its checkpoints. >> returning to australia now where firefighters are facing a tough night as they battle to get bushfires under control. the country has seen a week of record heat and high winds. >> this has helped the fires reach what is called catastrophic levels in some areas.% that means that the blazes are unpredictable and extremely fast-moving. residents in some areas have fled before the fires. >> it is a raging inferno that keeps on spreading. temperatures as high as 45 degrees celsius and strong winds have turned many states into tinderboxes. hundreds of bushfires are out of control, threatening to engulf the southeast of the country and the island of tasmania. authorities have closed down national parks, a firs
it comes down, it comes down all at once. we're seeing huge drops in china, massive floods in pakistan. there was hurricane sandy in the u.s. all around the world, a couple of years back in the kremlin, they had to ban wheat exports because they're having such extreme heat waves the could not export it anymore. we saw the price of grain go up threefold around the world. the message from all of this and what our weather agencies have been telling us, this is the new normal. this is not some freak extreme weather event. we have seen a trend over the past few decades of extreme weather events on the rise, getting worse and worse as we put more carbon pollution into the atmosphere and make climate change worse. >> you're just in antarctica. can you describe going from australia to antarctica and back? >> i just got back to australia yesterday from antarctica, where i was talking to people there about the impacts of climate change. western and predict that is still very cold, but it is actually the most quickly warming land mass. west antarctica has more than three times the global average
. there is even talk he might be held in south pakistan or paris. do you know why she thought that? >> the e-mail came from pakistan. that is why we started looking at the possibility but i don't believe he is there. i believe he is still in iran. >> they spoke with secretary clinton about her husband and they said they will do everything they can to help him be home. he has been missing since 2007. >> before you leigh the hou-- ae the house let's get an update on the weather. >> there could be tornadoes in southeastern texas. it is part of the storm system that is producing a flooding concern across eastern texas, louisiana and arkansas because it has a lot of moisture with it and it will be dumping a lot of heavy rain and has been doing so since yesterday across the areas. the good side of the storm is we have an invow across texas and oklahoma and we are seeing much needed rain in some of these areas. stay alert with flooding in your area. we are seeing areas across the great lakes. we will see rain across portions of the northeast with the same storm system. new orleans over mississippi
and one injured in a gunfight in the disputed territory of kashmir between india and pakistan. an indian army spokesperson says the shooting started when indian soldiers on patrol spotted pakistani troops on the indian side of the line of control. pakistani military officials deny the indian allegation that the firing was unprovoked. a gunfight also occurred in kashmir on sunday. one pakistani soldier died, and another was injured. india and pakistan have gone to war three times since their independence in 1947. analysts say the latest incidents may have a negative impact on the comprehensive talks for better relations that resumed in 2011. >>> students at a university in north korea got a surprise visitor. google chairman eric schmidt. they showed him how they look for information online, by googling it. schmidt visited kim il sung university in pyongyang on tuesday. he traveled to north korea with former new mexico governor bill richardson and seven others. they spoke with students at a university computer lab. schmidt has emphasized that he's traveling as a private citizen and not rep
attitudes in pakistan. we had to convince the pakistani government and populous that a stable afghanistan not under a taliban rule was in their interest and that the nato istaff mission was achievable because it was one thing for the pakistanis to generally wish we would succeed but in the summer of 2009 they didn't believe we could or would and they were hedging their bets to avoid paying the price if we didn't. of course we had to affect the american populous. we had to show parents where their sons and daughters were in a very difficult war a long way away. the first thing we had to was change people's attitude and say this is a new ball game. we're going to do this more seriously. we are going to do this right. we are going to focus and we are going to take everybody's interests into account. we can succeed and we will succeed. >> rose: success would be defined as? >> an afghanistan that could defend it's own sovereignty. i did not think it was our mission to craft a perfect afghanistan. i thought it was our aspiration, our goal to create a strong enough afghan security force, stable
run in pakistan so, i don't know. is it really helping us? go ahead. >> there is reason to be concerned, melissa. i think that this is what security analysts are really worried about. if we leave there can the afghan forces deal with call died? will taliban take over the country? will al qaeda come back in as a welcome guest? will they move over from pakistan? will they use afghanistan to destablize pakistan which has nuclear arsenal of over 100 weapons? what price security? how much did 9/11 cost us? we have to remember that. we have to be careful we don't just think about dollars and we think about security. melissa: we still have to think about dollars. that is what we started the show talking about how we're spending so much more than we're taking in. everybody has to give something up. we have got to cut money somewhere. when you look at dollars, we have 10,000 troops in there after 2014 it could cost $15 billion a year. 20,000 troops, that is $25 billion a year. the numbers become significant. a lot of americans wonder what are we getting for that? is it worth it w
. there was a suggestion that he might be held in pakistan, held by terrorists. do you know why she thought that? >> the email came from pakistan. that's why i believe we started looking at the possibility. but i don't believe that he is there. i believe he is still in iran. >> when you say email, you mean the email with those photos, is that right? >> correct. >> i know that an effort was made to try to find the source of the email. did you get any information at all as to who might have sent them to you? >> no. the email address was used one time and one time only. >> was it an email to you directly or to member else? >> it was directly to me. >> so, i mean, i guess that either -- i assume that the email was obtained from your husband, your email address. i assume that's how they got it. was that your assumption? >> i assumed so because he had that on his person when he disappeared -- or was taken. >> all right. so now there has been a shift. now the united states -- the state department believes -- and i don't know if you believe this as well -- that he is not being held by terrorists, but th
being held in pakistan by terrorists. do you know why she thought that? >> the e-mails came from pakistan and that is why i believe we started looking at the possibility, but i don't believe that he is there. i believe he is still in iran. >> greta: when you say e-mail, you mean the e-mail containing these photos, right? >> correct. >> greta: i know an effort was made to try to find the source of the e-mail. do you have any idea at all who may have sent them to you? >> no, the e-mail address was used one time and one time only. >> greta: was it an e-mail to you directly or to somebody else? >> it was directly to me. >> greta: so, i mean, i guess that either they-- i assume that the e-mail was obtained from your husband, your e-mail address, that's how they got it, was that your assumption? >> you assume so because he had that on his person when he disappeared, or was taken. >> greta: all right. so, now there's been a shift. now the united states, the state department believes, and i don't know, do you believe this as well, that he's not being held by terrorists, but by the irania
pakistan. they don't trust hamid karzai coming here. you remarked in the book you think he was elected but to a lot of the folks, they just don't trust him. >> it's very difficult. president karzai is the elected landlord of the country. we can't view our partner nations that we can call the shots. that is not what we want with the partner. we want a sovereign nation that can be strong. think we need to look at it that way. that the effort that our current policy is trying to implement. >> neil: do you think this president even wants to be in this region? he was critical about the bellicose nature of the bush years and he wanted to reverse that. he was stuck with it coming in and he couldn't get request quicker leaving? >> i think all americans, when they look at the region now, it's where the thrift 9/11 emanated from. we've had a difficult decade. >> neil: what would you have done after 9/11? >> it's interesting, i thought a lot about this. i would have acted a little differently but only with hindsight. first thing i would have done is 10,000 young americans to language school. i wo
. before it came from an internet cafe in pakistan. the u.s. has gotten good tracking down cellphone transmissions. this is the concern. >> shep: usually when somebody takes somebody, they want something in return. there hasn't been anything like that. >> you could say that is perhaps additional indicator that this is a government or intelligence agency within a government that is behind it. because, various times you want to be able to play out cards. you don't know what the relationship with the united states is going to be like down the road, who they are going to scoop up. maybe to trade somebody or you may just want to keep a bur in the side of united states. some of this trade and u.s. is doing things to try to find him. iranians may be examining what the u.s. is doing to see how it works in a case like this. >> shep: he was a private investigator at the time. maybe somebody wants to get information from them? >> that hasn't been fielded as a reason. remember all of this is murky. presumption that iranian agents, he was taken in kish but that is not a reason he had some kind of
from countries like afghanistan and pakistan who say the strikes have killed several hundred innocent civilians. >> we endeavor to reduce civilian casualties as much as possible. and i think that the broader record here of success in taking the fight to al qaeda is one that has made the united states safer. >> there have been at least six u.s. drone strikes conducted already this year, shep. >> shepard: james, the president and john brennan say the drone program is illegal. >> yes. and they have erected all kinds of elaborate legal justifications for carrying out the strikes. the goal of all of that lawyering was to shield the u.s. from challenges under international law. but civil liberty advocates don't buy that drones are used decisions against combatants. >> the use of drones may be more precise than bombardment, but that isn't the right question that we should be asking. the question is, is the use of drones lawful in the places in which we are using them and against the people who are being killed? and the answer to that is, no. >> also controversial, double tap drone strikes in
there will be a counter trr mission. there is a mission in the afghan and pakistan region. is it a suffice counter terror force with a force package? that takes us out of the nation building and the embedded with the afghan force. we are embedded with that force. we go to an operational level, the president has given us a thearm is not accurate. troops are not in combat operations. >> i agree all the time in afghanistan, but this question of what is the going to be in the next 24 months and how we transition to the mission in 2014. >> thank you for your time. still ahead, new comments from tech tear of state hillary clinton who is back at work as you know. we have video. >> i am thrilled to be back. >> thrilled to be back and what else? one of the things we thought you should know. plus, major turmoil in venezuela after hugo chavez's swearing in is put on hold after surgery for cancer. the latest there and lance armstrong opens up to oprah. what's being called a no holds barred interview about his doping allegations. 0. :: i have low testosterone. there, i said it. how did i know? well, i didn't really.
extent pakistan is playing a role in these conversations. >> reporter: that's a good question. obviously pakistan will have to play a significant role. we're trying to get more information on that as we go forward. having been in pakistan just more than a year ago for the death of osama bin laden, the challenges that exist there are as great as any, especially given waziristan and the areas where the two countries border, but also those avenues for the u.s. to be able to receive all of the munitions that it needs and its supply lines so pakistan will clearly be critical in terms of the u.s. conversation going forward. >> steve rattner? >> so chuck, just back to guns for a second. any guesses yet on what the shape of an obama package would look like and when it would come? >> well, it seems -- first of all, they said it's going to be in the state of the union. that's number one. the second is that it would -- you know, there seems to be that they're going around -- they want to push something on the magazines. push more on this mental health check aspect. i think they're going to throw th
region from pakistan, afghanistan and officials say iran made up the story to learn about the inner-workings of u.s. counterintelligence. the but the bottom line, bill, that the united states authorities have now told the ap wire service they believe iran is behind this abduction. now what can washington do to try and encourage iran? bill: big question. they have a daughter who is getting married in a month. we'll talk to the mother christine. that is the wife of robert, what she believes is the whereabouts of her husband. she still thinks he is in iran. the government needs to do more to bring him home. christine levinson, our guest live next hour here in "america's newsroom." we'll have that for you live. martha: tough for her. she is coming up at the top of the next hour. meantime we're learning some new details about possible white house plans for troop withdrawals from afghanistan ahead of next year's drawdown. there is a new report out that has an administration official floating the idea of pulling out all of the troops. the so-called zero option. molly henneberg is with us i
to afghanistan, pakistan is where al qaeda is today. the president, on over 300 occasions, has authorized strikes to kill al qaeda on one side of the mountain and we're trying to keep them from coming in on the other side back into afghanistan. and to leave that place open would hurt our own security so i don't want to stay there for the sake of the afghans but i want to leave enough of our special operations forces there so they can strike wherever they have to and we can't do that if we pull out entirely. >> celeste ward gventer, why doesn't that make sense? >> well, i think you have to consider whether, if we left 20,000 or nine thousand or 3,000 troops there, when does it end? when is this over? it seems like a recipe for just staying there, disrupting these groups in perpetuity, and it's not clear to me that advances what is ultimately a complete kel problem in afghanistan. it's no at military problem. also, our presence may be creating what is called a moral hazard. states in the region and political groups in afghanistan are precisely not reaching the accommodation they need to reach becau
shows this morning but ours. it's a shame. i wanted to ask her about pakistan. i'll have to wait. >> what did you learn today? >> tomorrow matthew from downton abbey is coming. >> no way! >> disastrous booking. lady mary should be coming. >> talk to matthew about lady mary. >> it's like musburger has this creepy thing. >> very creepy. >> about a.j.'s girlfriend. you've got a creepy thing about lady mary. >> we all have a creepy thing about lady mary. >> what did you learn today? >> i learned elizabeth warren and i agree on this aig thing. >> that's what i learned! we have that in common. >> fantastic. >> what would elizabeth do? you're going to get a little sticker. >> we were just talking about being old and what constitutes being old. meacham brought up winston churchill. 65 when he became prime minister. saved western civilization. if you turned 60 now, my life's behind me. churchill, not prime minister until -- >> it's time for "morning joe." now it's time for the great chuck todd. >> he's fantastic. >> we love you, chuck. i'm sorry for him. >>> with afghanistan's president h
to afghanistan, pakistan is where al qaeda is today. the president on over 300 occasions, has authorized strikes to kill al qaeda on one side of the mountain and we're trying to keep them from coming in on the other side back into afghanistan. and to leave that place open would hurt our own security so i don't want to stay there for the sake of the afghans but i want to leave enough of our special operations forces there so they can strike wherever they have to and we can't do that if we pull out entirely. >> celeste ward gventer, why doesn't that make sense? >> well, i think you have to consider whether if we left 20,000 or nine thousand or 3,000 troops there, when does it end? when is this over? it seems like a recipe for just staying there, disrupting these groups in perpetuity, and it's not clear to me that advances what is ultimately a complete kel problem in afghanistan. it's no at military problem. also our presence may be creating what is called a moral hazard. states in the region and political groups in afghanistan are precisely not reaching the accommodation they need to reach because
once coalition forces leave in 2014. diplomats in afghanistan, pakistan and the united states will participate. you can watch the event live beginning at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span2. >> people who describe themselves as libertarians, dependent which we look at you might begin between 10 and 15%. if you ask questions like if you give people a battery of questions about different ideological things do you believe in x., do you believe and why, and you can't and you track of two different ideologies, and in a witch boy you're looking at you get up to maybe 30% of americans that's calling themselves a libertarian. if you ask the following questions, are you economically conservative but socially liberal, you get over half of americans call themselves like saying that's what they are. that said, just because people say these things it doesn't necessarily mean they really believe them. if you ask most americans do you want smaller government, they said yes, but if you ask the one government to spend much -- less money, they say yes. if you ask them to cut any particular item, they do
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)